Friday, March 11, 2011

pages and pages...

408 of them, to be exact! I just received the final typeset pages for The Colonel's Lady which I'm reviewing for the last time before it goes to print. This go round I have an author's note and also acknowledgements, something I don't always do. Hope you read and enjoy them:) If I could tell each of you readers how much you mean to me, the acknowledgements would be as long as the novel! The page count was 448 but has shrunk a bit now that it's in book form. The longer the better, I say...

This lovely oil painting by artist Meadow Gist at left could be taken right out of The Colonel's Lady. But no spoilers here!

I have to mention a very special blog happening tomorrow at Carla's site. Our beloved Mary Spencer, 18th-century reenactor extraordinaire, will be answering questions from readers. I hope you'll stop by if you have time. Carla has been doing a wonderful series called Dressing a Colonial Lady on her blog recently. Paul and I have a fiddling jam bright and early but will try to visit once we're home.

Speaking of all things 18th-century, which aspects of dress back then do you find appealing? As for me, I'm on the hunt for a hand fan. If you know of a site that might be helpful, I'd love to know about it.

Bless you all!

47 comments:

  1. Oh Laura, I can't wait to get my hands on a copy of The Colonel's Lady!

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  2. So many people are looking forward to this book coming out! Especially me!!! That is a lot of writing, Miss Laura. God bless you for that. I know you just did it for all of us. :)

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  3. Ruth, I can't wait till you do either:) 'Twill be interesting to see which of the 3 books you like best. Discerning readers have their favorites, don't ya know?!

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  4. Carrie, So thankful you're one of them! It IS a lot of writing though it reads staccato to me in places! Thanks so much for the gracious thumbs up. I really did do it for you readers:)

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  5. And I'm going to savor every word! I love the updates that you give us about the writing and publication process.

    Oh, you tease us with that photo! Meadow's painting are wonderful.
    As for the favorite aspects of 18thc dress...I'd have to say I just love the embroidered stomachers and the ruffled cuffs.

    Thanks a bunch for sharing about my series on Dressing the Colonial Lady and announcing the special forum tomorrow. Drop by anytime you can, we'll be visiting throughout the day!

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  6. How exciting...I look forward to having a copy in my hands or on the itouch....=)

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  7. I'm so glad TCL will be coming out on Kindle, Laura! There's nothing like the instant gratification of buying a favorite author's newest release and being able to begin reading right away.

    I can't even do that if I buy a book in the store, because I have to grab a coffee on the way out (choosing a flavor can take a while), drive home, maybe hit a few sales along the way. And if I'm with friends when I purchase a book, forget about it! They want me to converse in the car and be sociable while the new book is burning a whole in my bag. Ugh!

    I've enjoyed checking out some of the special dressing videos you've marked on FB. I wish I could find a special costume to wear while reading TCL, but I'm afraid my friends would really think I was beyond book-obsessed if I did! Sigh . . .

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  8. Just dropped by to say hi and see what you were up to. Congratulations on doing your final review of Colonel's Lady. Like the others, I can't wait to read it.

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  9. I always love to read the author's note and acknowledgements. So much so I wrote one for my last WIP. LOL, it's changed so much now I will need to rewrite it, but it was still a thrill to do so. :) The days are getting closer!! I can't wait. :D

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  10. Laura, can't wait for TCL's release. I'm so looking forward to holding it in my hands. Even better that it's over 400 pages. I wish more books were.

    As for something appealing about 18th century dress, I would have to say modesty.

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  11. Congrats on being another step closer to printing, my friend, so exciting! Oh, and the more pages to read, especially when YOU'RE behind the pen, the better!! You just don't want your time with your new friends to end! And you're just hoping for one more look, one more touch, one more kiss between hero and heroine *sigh*

    Anyway, like everyone else, I CANNOT wait to hold, read and experience The Colonel's Lady!!! I'm especially excited to read how you've done a male POV :D And, I always read the author's notes and acknowledgements, and I'm sure I'll enjoy yours, my friend :)

    I like what Lori said about modesty being the most appealing thing about the dress back then. Seems worlds away from today. I also love how feminine and classy it all was and they looked so beautiful without "giving away the farm" - there was more of an air of mystery about a woman. I'm also a fan of the fan ;)

    Happy reviewing and fiddling! :)

    Blessings,
    Amanda

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  12. I love reading acknowledgements especially since joining ACFW and hearing semi-familiar names. And I love the historical notes. The more words to your next book the better.

    I haven't a clue about good sources for costumes. I must confess I love old hats and hatboxes. And shoes.

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  13. I'll read all 408 pages. Summer can't come fast enough!

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  14. Carla, I just read everyone's comments over at your forum and they're wonderful:) I need to take some notes. I hope readers will forgive me that I use a tricorn in TCL as that is not quite correct. I knew that but took literary license anyway! Oh, the fun of sorting fact from fiction...

    I really think the stomachers were beautiful, too, and love that the cuffs came on and off. They really gave a gown a different look. Anyway, thanks for such a great series your way! I'm going to post about my latest fripperies but you and Mary and Adam are a hard act to follow:)

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  15. Maggie Ann, I look forward to the moment you do, too:) I read about 40 more pages of the typeset book today after the fiddle jam, and it's more like my first book than Morrow's story. More narrative and history whereas CML was more romance. Guess that's the defining element between historical fiction vs. historical romance. Anyway, bless you for your gracious thoughts here!

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  16. LOL, Renee Ann:) Burning a hole in your bag, indeed:) Think we're twins... And I so love getting dressed up. I think this costuming thing is the best thing ever! Wait till I post about my 2 fripperies next week. I think you'll smile - or sigh! Wish we were closer and go shopping and bookstore crazy together!

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  17. Naomi,
    It's a funny thing about those typeset pages. When I got them for TFD that first time, I read them through in one sitting till I was absolutely cross-eyed! I'm not so zealous or stressed these days. Think I'd better do a post on the evolution of a writer and how much things change from book to book! So hope you enjoy Roxanna's story!

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  18. Casey, I heard you can just skip those old acknowledgements and author notes as YOU ARE IN Julie Lessman's next book!! Congrats on that:) You're right about things changing and having to redo acknowledgements. I didn't have them for CML but went overboard for TCL... Am sure they'll be very different for book 1 of The Ballanytyne Legacy. But that's half the fun, I guess:)

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  19. Lori,
    You said something wonderful - yes, modesty. The lost virtue. I think the clothing then was so feminine. And all that exquisite detail, done by hand. Nothing like it today. It makes me a bit sad but at least we can bring that to life in our books.

    So happy you're happy about that word/page count! I'm at 91k for this first next book and anxiously watching as it climbs to my cap of 110. Sigh...

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  20. Yes, Amanda, there was mystery in that lovely, elegant style of dress - well said:) The rustle of silk is delicious. No wonder men found it so appealing and it led to romance! And I love fans, like you. My friend Mary sent me a great link so think I'll order a lace fan as I found one that's inexpensive yet elegant.

    I'm so thrilled you're thrilled about this next book. It's a little like a dream having a book out every year with 4 more to come. God is so good:)

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  21. Julia, I bet you do run across familiar names from the loops and ACFW, etc. I'm starting to do that, too, when I read other authors acknowledgements. I also love dedications at the front of books. Some are quite touching. This time I have 2 - well, 3, actually! But no spoilers here:)

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  22. Winter, I chuckled as your comment began with "summer" and I did a double-take:) Your name is so lovely I think I've told you it belongs in a novel.

    BTW, are you going to be at ACFW this year? Hope so. So thankful you're my reader!

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  23. I'm so glad you enjoyed and thank you for coming by with your questions. It wouldn't have been complete without you there. I can't wait to hear about your fripperies ~ it is always a delight to come to your blog, my friend!

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  24. I can hardly wait for summer! First your book! Then I get to read about my favorite critique partner! You can be sure both are books for the old keeper shelf.

    (Plus, I have to admit there's another reason I'm excited for summer. More time to work on my manuscript and running on the playground :)

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  25. Unfortunately, Laura, I won't make it this year, as the first day of the conference is my youngest son's birthday. We just received news that my husband won't have to go to Afghanistan--though he's an alternate which there could be a slim chance of it happening--and he's in pursuit of a teaching job in Iowa, which means we could be moving this summer. So that doubles my not going to conference this year because of moving expenses.

    Oh, Laura, keep an eye on my Facebook page--not too hard, but just keep an eye. Something will be coming that will just make you all giddy!

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  26. Oh Winter, I like GIDDY:) Thanks for the heads up! I'm so thankful your husband won't be deployed. I have been thinking of that ever since you shared that last fall. As for moving, I love moving:) It's always a big adventure to me. Anyway, bless you for stopping back by and I promise to keep an eye on that FB page!

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  27. Julia,
    I didn't know you were critting with Casey:) That's great! YES, summers are great as they free homeschoolers up so very much. I used to bring my manuscript to the park/playground:)

    Carla, Heading back over to your blog one final time before going to bed. You've had a busy day:)

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  28. Dear Laura,
    Thank you so much for the kind words. We were so busy yesterday, answering all the great questions for Carla's forum that this is the first chance I have had to 'visit'.
    We had such a great time yesterday, and it was our pleasure to be a part of such a nice presentation. We hope we helped everyone!

    So exciting about your book! I look forward to reading it!

    As for dressing in the 18thc., as a long-time reeanctor, I can tell you I actually love being in the clothes better than in 21st c. things! It is the FEELING you get. I feel not only more feminine, but you actually get a feeling of the decorum, manners, and romance of the times! You WANT to go back and experience some of the courtliness and the chivalry~That's what your books are for!
    Thank you~
    Mare

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  29. Hmm...What is that picture saying? Is it a widow with a little girl? Is it the Colonel's nanny and his girl? Is it a portrait of the young lady and her sister? She is caring for her younger sister because her parents were killed tragically? Oh the possibilities!!! I guess I will just have to wait until summer with baited breath. Maybe the publisher will be kind to us and move it up a little(I sure the author has some kind of pull ;)LOL

    Have a fabulous week! I am about to order Siri Mitchell's new book. Only 2 more days until we can enjoy Liz!!

    PS..I love looking at the history of hats!

    Stacie

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  30. I can't wait for TCL to come out! As for acknowledgements...I love them! Hope your week is blessed.

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  31. Laura,

    Yes, the detail in 18th century clothing is another thing I love.

    And I hear you about that word count. I'm already getting anxious and I'm not yet 20,000 words into my new novel. Already I'm saying, "I have to somehow combine chapters 2 and 3, and probably chapters 4 and 5 too. I always overwrite the first quarter of the book, at least. But I'm getting to know my characters and that takes dallying about in their heads and hearts a bit longer than I'd need to toward the end. It might not be until I'm done with the first daft before I know exactly what I CAN cut out of those early chapters. Some story and character material is best left until later to introduce and develope. But at the start I just want to spill it all out!

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  32. Hi Laura! I'm back and better than every...well almost, I still have that pesky stuffy nose! I'm super excited that TCL is over 400 pages! I have to admit I love books thick and juicy...probably why your books and Julie Lessman's are some of my faves. ;-)

    I absolutely love antique clothing, it just seems to have an air of femininity and grace that most clothes don't have today although I don't know how comfortable and feminine all those layers would be in the midst of summer! Eeeek can you say perspiration? LOL

    I hope you found your fan, I'm sure it will be gorgeous!

    XOXO~ Renee

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  33. So pleased for you, Laura :) Congratulations on what I know will be a job well done!

    Hugs xo

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  34. Oh, 408 pages! I absolutely cannot wait to read them!

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  35. Mary,
    YES, you are so right - dressing for the 18th-century feels incredible! When I tried my gown on I was amazed that it truly made me feel different. Difficult to explain but you said it so well - it gives us a glimpse into the times and the chivalry and romance and detail of that time. I know when I'm all gussied up with shoes, hip pockets, stockings and all else I'll feel even moreso. Thanks so much for being here. It's a great blessing!

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  36. Staice Hope, You have a very good imagination:) Love hearing your ideas. You'd be great at brainstorming novels! So glad you get to order Siri's latest. Amazon just notified me that Liz's is on the way! That's one book I have to have in hand and not on my Kindle. It's sure fun sharing our JOY about MITN here:)

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  37. Colleen, So glad you like acknowledgements. They really are fun to write! I'm always a bit disappointed when a book doesn't have them. Thankfully, most do. It's kind of like dessert at the end of a book:)

    Praying your writing is going well and all else, dear friend!

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  38. Lori, I so understand the overwriting at first. Better that than having to insert text later as that is much harder to me! Another thing I've noticed is that I tend to rewrite the first chapters once I come to book's end, as I see how the story could benefit from additional scenes or tweaked scenes at the very beginning. It's really like a puzzle, this writing. If I didn't love it so much, I'd hate it:) Hope this is a great writing week for you on all levels!

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  39. Renee, So glad you like longer books. When I see a book that's under 350 pages I wince. I don't know how a person tells a story in so short a book but am sure editors love that.

    Thankful you're better. Lots of bugs flying around:( The nose is always the last to mend...

    Love your word choice - femininity and grace. That really sums that century up as far as dressing. Stacie Hope mentioned the hats which I forgot to say are something I adore, too:) I think I will only wear one petticoat with my silk gown. I'm already thankful the venue is air-conditioned:)

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  40. Rel,
    Your words mean a great deal. I hope readers love this story. It's more historical fiction than romance this go round though there's plenty of sizzle, especially in the middle. I have my faults but have never been accused of that:) Have a wonderful week!

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  41. Michelle, So happy you can't wait! BTW, Amazon just told me MITN has SHIPPED:) But you have yours already. No peeking, now, or maybe you've already dived in?!

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  42. And by the way, Laura, I don't know if I've ever said this but I love visiting your blog. It has a fragrance of restfulness and peace, of thoughtful grace, thankfulness, and joy.

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  43. Lori, What a lovely thing to say! Things:) I've always loved the word fragrance as it reminds me of a particular Scripture. Bless you so much for saying so.

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  44. Thanks for making me chuckle today with your comment about wearing only one petticoat! I can't imagine how they did it without air conditioning! You'll do a splendid job, I think!

    I guess the best time period would probably be the Regency period. Some of those white gowns that you see on films like Pride and Prejudice seem like they might actually be light and breezy on a summer day.

    XOXO~ Renee

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  45. Renee, I think you might be on to something with those light Regency dresses. Not long ago I was researching and came across Empress Eugenie of Napoleon fame. Seems she created quite a scandal at one ball as everyone could see right through her dress to everything beneath:) Not one petticoat! Nor anything else! I bet she was the coolest one in the room...

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  46. So glad that MITN has shipped! I have started reading it. I'm on chapter 14 right now. Very good so far. ;)

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  47. Michelle, I'm comforted by that smiley;) I'm still not over Rob, truth be told. Or Somerled, for that matter...

    Happy reading!

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